Monthly Archives: April 2014

Fostering Musical Creativity Ten Tips: 2 of 10

Number Two of Ten: Maximize opportunities to give choice. Teachers should allow students the freedom to approach an activity their way. This increases intrinsic motivation and gives students a sense of ownership. Learning can happen spontaneously through self-discovery and does not

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Fostering Musical Creativity Ten Tips: 1 of 10

Number One of Ten: The most limited resource in education is time. Playing with ideas takes time. Allocate sufficient time to experiment with musical ideas. Jean-Jacques Rousseau said, “The most useful rule of education is: Do not save time but lose

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Musical Creativity (& improvisation) : Pt 2 of 2

Continued from Musical Creativity: Part 1 Students who learn in creative ways learn well. Creative learning is fun, engaging, and motivating. It requires identifying problems, considering multiple possibilities, making decisions, and finding solutions. Creative people are more likely to have

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Musical Creativity: Pt 1of 2

A general perception is that making music is inherently creative, but this is not so. Many who learn an instrument seldom engage in the cores of creative music—composing, improvising, and rearranging. Rather, music education programs focus mostly on the re-creation

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Imagination: Practising Without Instrument, Without Notation.

In recent years brain-scanning techniques have revealed the true ability of the brain to learn via the imagination. In one experiment the brain of a young violinist was scanned to compare two conditions: 1) playing the violin with notation; and

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