Music Education Messages for Parents

mg at kings nswIn early February 2016 I was in Sydney, Australia, speaking to various groups of parents with children learning music.

The content of my 45-minute talk included a mixture of music education advocacy and pragmatic advice for supporting their children in the often difficult commitment of practising.

Firstly, we can acknowledge that parents have made a wise choice to include music in the overall education of their child. As well as the specific musical benefits, virtually nothing requires the character traits of commitment, persistence, impulse control, resilience and stick-at-it-ive-ness to the degree that music learning does. Therefore the very fact that students continue to work at music is a testament of character. An earlier blog discusses this in more detail, including details of a character development study from Birmingham University. When children give up music it is usually because of a lack of progress. This is directly related to lack of practice – the quality and the quantity of practice. The most important aspect of quantity is distribution. That is, children should do some practice every day (or only on the days that they eat, as Dr Suzuki says). Quality practice mostly refers to stopping to fix mistakes using chunking (isolating small bits for further attention), and slow, mistake-free repetitions. This is where parent support with younger children is vital. One doesn’t have to be musically educated to hear wrong notes, or to know that the playing is too fast. As well, interest taken by parents send a signal to the child that the activity is valued. Children take on the value systems of their parents.

A short speech at a music information night is a great way to educate parents about their unique capacity to support. A guest speaker reiterates the school message with an impact affording an external expert. School newsletters also provide opportunities for communicating these essential understandings to parents.

These topics are further explored in ‘Learning Strategies for Musical Success’ by Michael Griffin.

Reviews below.

The Music Trust 

VMTA

American Music Teacher

Ritmico NZ

“Super book. I am so impressed!” – Donna Michaels, USA

“Rarely do I come away feeling so inspired. Incredibly beneficial.” – Music Matters Blog

“Deeply impressive, the breadth of research is fascinating!” – Robert Chamberlain, Team of Pianists and Monash University Piano Staff, Victoria Australia.

front cover final

“I have read your book and it has made an amazing difference in my teaching and in my studio.” Beth Cruickshank, Past President – Ontario Registered Music Teachers Association.

Purchase: AmazonAmazon UKKindle USKindle UK
Australia: Contact mdgriffin63@gmail.com for direct mail.

Also by Michael Griffin

BookCoverPreview

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Fundamentals of Notation is a unit of work for general music middle school classes. Designed around the mastering of practical skills, it integrates theory, aural and history, and allows students to progress at their own rate. View Table of Contents.  “This has been a great buy; the books are just superb! Interesting topics with a wide range of pieces. Great content with clear progression of learning. Fascinating teaching philosophy! BRAVO!” -The Grieg Academy, London. Available at Amazon.com

BookCoverPreview Bk 2

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Let’s Get Creative! is the fun and creative extension to ‘Fundamentals of Notation’.

View Table of Contents. “We have been using your keyboard course and the results have been amazing!”  – St George College, Australia

Available at Amazon.com

BookCover VR

‘Bumblebee: Rounds & Warm-ups for Choirs’

Second edition. Bumblebee! is more than just a wonderful collection of 130 choir exercises and rounds. The author shares timeless wisdom to help you get your choir – primary or secondary – into shape. 

“This is a great resource to add to one’s library of rehearsal tricks.”- Anacrusis, ACCC, Canada

harmony bk cover

Modern Harmony Method: Fundamentals of Jazz and Popular Harmony (Third Edition, 2013) is a clear and well organised text suitable for students of arranging and composition, and for classically trained musicians wishing to grasp the beautiful logic of jazz harmony. Essential understandings include chord selection, voicing, symbols, circle of 4th progressions, extensions, suspensions and alterations. Included in the 107 pages are explanations, examples, exercises and solutions. The course can be started with students in year 9 and worked through to year 12 musicianship, composing and arranging.  Available at Amazon.com

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in character, motivation, Music Education, Practice, prep, primary

Thrive! Linking intrinsic motivation, mindset and metacognitive processes

Thrive ppt

On January 27, 2016 I had the opportunity to present a keynote speech to the 150 staff at Ballarat Grammar School. The title (above) provided great scope to investigate the psychology and practicality of generating a rich self-directed learning environment.

Few understandings are more crucial for educators than motivation. Motivation drives our choices and actions. The ‘fuel’ of human behaviour, it creates in us a desire to persist beyond the boundaries of comfort, leading to achievement greater than previously thought possible. Intrinsic motivation is linked with higher quality learning. Students are less easily distracted, take more initiative,  and persist for longer with their learning. To condition the learning environment for intrinsic motivation to flourish, observe this simple tripartite model: competence, autonomy and relationship. Competence involves a self-belief that one can make progress. When people think they are no good at something, and not getting any better, they often stop trying and give up. Relationship refers to the fact that students who perceive their teachers as being cold and uncaring experience lower levels of motivation. Students therefore need to know that we like them, respect and value them. Autonomy is about personal volition. It includes finding opportunities to provide students with choice when appropriate and empowering students to drive their own learning as much as possible. This is where mindset and metacognition comes in. In the long run, learners with a growth-mindset achieve more that those who believe their ability is more due to talent than work ethic (fixed-mindset). Metacognition includes higher order learning skills, learning driven by curiosity and Socratic questioning.

This is but a brief overview of the presentation, designed to have teachers thinking about their pedagogy in relationship to learning outcomes. I spoke for 75 minutes to the BGS R-12 staff, but I present whole day courses on this material (Australia all states – dates in March and May 2016, UK Sept/Oct 2016). Contact me mdgriffin63@gmail.com for further information.

Also, my book ‘Learning Strategies for Musical Success’ relates this general learning psychology to a more specific music education context. This is available through me, Amazon, and stores across the UK.

 

Posted in character, metacognition, mindset, motivation, Music psychology, primary, Uncategorized

Motivation and the Drive to Learn

Why is it that some people achieve so much more than others? This simple question is one of the big concerns for education. Essentially though, it is motivation that underpins people’s choices and actions. Motivation is the fuel of human behaviour; nothing gets done without it. It is motivation that creates in us a desire to overcome obstacles, to persist beyond the boundaries of comfort, and to achieve beyond ours and others wildest expectations. Therefore, an understanding of how motivation works must be an overarching concern for parents and educators.

In her studies on achievement motivation, Harvard’s Teresa Amabile found the greatest motivational factor to be progress. People just love to get better at what they do. When progress stalls, most people give up.

An even greater level of motivation occurs when people believe they can make progress through their own efforts rather than because of external factors. For this autonomous competence to occur educators must provide students with the tools for making progress thereby providing independent and self-reliant learning. One of these tools is a growth mindset. We owe it to children to impart an understanding that the greatest factor in making progress and ultimate success is the quality and the quantity of their work and practice time. This triumphs all else – including perceptions of natural ability. A healthy growth mindset encapsulates several desirable learning traits including persistence, commitment and an ability to bounce back from failure.

Therefore, understanding motivation begins with appreciating this dynamic relationship between autonomy and competence in learning. Whilst much of motivation theory might seem to be common sense, not all teaching and motivational precepts are intuitive. For example, many teachers and parents praise children hoping to increase self-esteem and confidence when in fact the evidence shows mostly counter-productive learning and behavioural outcomes resulting from praise. Not all praise is harmful, but educators need to differentiate between types of praise (informational verses controlling) and know when and how to use it.

For some educators, taking a professional development course about the psychology of motivation will revolutionise their teaching pedagogy. For others, it might serve as a timely reminder of how to drive curiosity and enjoyable learning in the classroom.

Michael Griffin will be providing professional development on this topic throughout Australia February-April 2016, and in the UK September-October. Contact mdgriffin63@gmail.com for further details.

Posted in Uncategorized

The Tools for Musical Progress

I’ve just completed a speaking tour in Australia taking in Melbourne, Sydney, Bathurst, Newcastle, Launceston and Ulverstone. My talks were directed to staffs and students – general and music-specific – in school classrooms, assemblies and at conferences. I’d like to share a little about my keynote address ‘The Tools for Musical Progress’ for the Sounds Great! conference at the Victorian Arts Centre, Melbourne, July 2015.

It really is a simple message, but sometimes simple truth gets lost in the forest of new ideas. That is – the greatest motivator, trumping all else – is making progress. People just love to get better at what they do. The converse is a concern; should children make no progress with their musical endeavours, they will almost certainly give up.  The greatest contribution that an education can give a child is the autonomous tools for making progress. Clearly, the greatest predictor for musical progress is the quality and the quantity of practice time.

[Please note that in my presentations and in my book on this subject each discussion point  is accompanied by research, historical anecdotes, examples and personal stories.]

How do you practise, and how do you teach it? It is easy to fall into the trap of telling a pupil that they ‘need to do more practice’, or to ‘practise more slowly’. Unfortunately these words have little effect. Students need these skills modelled to them, and to have the chance to copy. It gets forgotten that mimicry is still the greatest meta-skill that underpins the successful acquisition of all physical skills, including talking and walking. Virtuosic music-making demands the greatest sequence of co-ordinated muscular skill possible. It represents the  pinnacle of human skill capacity. In my talks, I distil practice into a simple three-part model: Repetition, Chunking and Slow Practice. These are the essentials, and nothing is more important for consolidation. BUT you must know how to practise. Take repetition, for instance; you must know how to repeat. Students need to learn about the enormous power of spaced repetition, an aspect of variable repetition as distinct from the usual but less effective model of blocked repetition (drills give a false sense of competency). You see, not all repetition methods are equal. I explain the neuroscience and the psychology behind each method, along with examples from marketing, sport and other areas of learning. Likewise, what happens in the brain that renders slow-practice so utterly effective, and therefore why is it the hardest aspect of practice for children to actually do? This blog-length limits what I can explain, but it is all perfectly clear in my book. Educators need to be able to articulate the how and why of what we teach to children.

Yesterday I arrived in the UK. This September/October I am presenting on these learning concepts – from short keynotes to interactive workshops of several hours – to music services in Hampshire, Wandsworth, Guernsey, Bath & North-East Somerset, Devon, and East Sussex. (I have room for more…) This excites me because the message is so important, and it can be kept simple without losing its profundity. The testimonials I receive consistently indicate a positive impact on musical learning and teaching. Whilst I love engaging with music educators through the music services and conferences, most of my work is still in schools, of which presently number about 250 schools in more than 25 countries.  I speak and demonstrate on the piano to all levels of music students, differentiating for prep through to a more appropriate level for senior secondary students. My favourite presentation model invites parents to join their children and music tutors in a twilight 75-minute presentation. Schools will often invite members of the community to join in. For example, I will be speaking at King’s High School in Warwick on Wednesday September 16. Director of Music Matthew Smallwood has opened this lecture to members of the public. If you would like to attend this  or another presentation (schools in Bristol, Surrey, Sussex, Hampshire, Devon, Berkshire to name a few counties) I can tell you when I am in your part of the UK, and at which school. Alternatively, if this is something that appeals for your school or music conference, contact me (mdgriffin63@gmail.com) with preferred dates and times. United Arab Emirates – November 2015. Schools in Australia and New Zealand – bookings for Term 1, 2016. South Africa – April, 2016.

 

front cover final

“I have read your book and it has made an amazing difference in my teaching and in my studio.” Beth Cruickshank, Past President – Ontario Registered Music Teachers Association.

“Deeply impressive, the breadth of research is fascinating!” – Robert Chamberlain, Team of Pianists and Monash University Piano Staff, Victoria Australia.

Amazon
Amazon UK
Kindle US
Kindle UK
Australia: Contact mdgriffin63@gmail.com for direct mail.

Also by Michael Griffin

BookCoverPreview

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Fundamentals of Notation is a unit of work for general music middle school classes. Designed around the mastering of practical skills, it integrates theory, aural and history, and allows students to progress at their own rate. View Table of Contents.  “This has been a great buy; the books are just superb! Interesting topics with a wide range of pieces. Great content with clear progression of learning. Fascinating teaching philosophy! BRAVO!” -The Grieg Academy, London. Available at Amazon.com

BookCoverPreview Bk 2

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Let’s Get Creative! is the fun and creative extension to ‘Fundamentals of Notation’.

View Table of Contents. “We have been using your keyboard course and the results have been amazing!”  – St George College, Australia

Available at Amazon.com

BookCover VR

‘Bumblebee: Rounds & Warm-ups for Choirs’

Second edition. Bumblebee! is more than just a wonderful collection of 130 choir exercises and rounds. The author shares timeless wisdom to help you get your choir – primary or secondary – into shape.
View Table of Contents.

“Will prove useful for almost everyone”- Rhinegold Music Teacher Magazine.

“This is a great resource to add to one’s library of rehearsal tricks.”- Anacrusis, ACCC, Canada

harmony bk cover

Modern Harmony Method: Fundamentals of Jazz and Popular Harmony (Third Edition, 2013) is a clear and well organised text suitable for students of arranging and composition, and for classically trained musicians wishing to grasp the beautiful logic of jazz harmony. Essential understandings include chord selection, voicing, symbols, circle of 4th progressions, extensions, suspensions and alterations. Included in the 107 pages are explanations, examples, exercises and solutions. The course can be started with students in year 9 and worked through to year 12 musicianship, composing and arranging.  Available at Amazon.com

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Chunking, Music Education, Music psychology, Pianists, Practice, prep, Repetition, slow practice

Music Education for Character Education

In 2015 the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues at the University of Birmingham called for character education to be embedded in UK curriculum. The report linked strong character traits such as resilience and perseverance to higher educational achievement, employability, and social, emotional and physical health. Character matters. It is critical for personal happiness, maintaining relationships, and essential for an ordered society. Character strengths help people to thrive and become the best version of themselves. But how is it taught, cultivated and nurtured? UK Education secretary Nicky Morgan, in her quest to help schools build character, says one way to learn character traits is to learn a musical instrument. The Education Secretary is correct, of course. The Jubilee Centre study found that students involved in choir/music or drama performed significantly better on character tests than any other school-based extra-curricular activity. Interestingly, evidence that sporting activities build character was lacking. This is perhaps surprising given the widespread public belief in sport as a character builder.

There is nothing new in this modern-day appeal for character education to be embedded in schools, nor in the relationship between character formation and musical learning. In particular, the views of Confucius, Pythagoras and Aristotle are worth noting. Confucius (551–479 BC) believed the real purpose of education was not to get a job, but to become a better person. The ‘cultivation of the self’ should be a ‘daily renovation’, and is a life-long process, requiring constant work and practice. Confucius considered music education to be indispensable for character cultivation:

Wouldst thou know if a people be well-governed, if its laws be good or bad? Examine the music it practises.

Because of the deep influence music exerts on a person, and the change it produces on manners and customs, the ancient kings appointed it as one of the subjects of instruction

A man who is not good, what can he have to do with music?

Hence Confucius suggested that the teaching of music, along with poetry, history and ritual, be the foundation for teaching moral behaviour. His view has support throughout history, for instance from Napoleon Bonaparte: “A moral book might change a person’s mind but not his heart, and therefore, not his ways. However, a piece of moral music would change his heart, and where the heart goes the mind will follow and the person’s ways will change.” To be a person of character is a choice from less virtuous alternatives, so according to Napoleon, the moral choice would be arrived at through a change of heart influenced by music.

Aristotle (385-322 BC) believed that character is formed by doing. For example, one can only learn about commitment by being committed to a cause. One learns to delay gratification by exercising the patience and experiencing the possible discomfort that comes with the act of waiting. Aristotle believed that the development of character strengths took time, but nevertheless could be taught and learned through practice. The repetition of the act becomes a habit, resulting in consistent patterns of action.

Human excellence, in morality as in musicality, comes about as a result of habit. – Aristotle, Book II of the Nicomachean Ethics

Therefore, a person cannot be considered a “good person deep down” unless character traits are in action.

Pythagoras (570-490 BC) may well be the first person on record who employed music as a therapeutic agent. He believed that beauty and truth combined in music and so music could “quell the passions of the soul”. In his philosophy, medicine and therapy were based on music. Pythagoras believed that an appreciation of beauty aided recovery from illness, a position now supported by modern-day research. He called the medicine obtained through music ‘purification.’ Hence music played an important part in Pythagorean education because music could purify both manners, character, and physical ailments. Those who committed crimes were prescribed “pipe (possibly the panpipe) and harmony” to shape the mind so that it became cultured again.  At night Pythagoreans sang certain songs to produce tranquil sleep and induce sweet dreams. In the morning they sang different songs to awaken and prepare for the day. Sometimes the music was instrumental, played on the lyre alone. Pythagoras considered the study of music essential for a rational understanding of God and nature. If education is about integrating thought, Pythagoras and the Greek thinkers who followed him led the way.

Contrast the esteem of which music was held by the Ancient Greeks (and classical China) to the Roman Empire that followed. Music was not valued beyond entertainment, and became peripheral in education and culture. Rather than science, arts and intellectual thought, Rome’s focus was toward conquest and pleasure. Interestingly, one of the main reasons attributed for the decline of the Roman Empire was a decline in moral character. If only they had listened to Confucius.

Music is the only one of all the arts that does not corrupt the mind. – Montesquieu, 1689 – 1759, French Philosopher

The family is the first place where moral cultivation begins. If adults wish to raise children of good character, they should start by showing them through their own actions.

Children may not listen to their parents, but they never fail to imitate them. – James A. Baldwin, 19241987, American, social critic.

Schools also play an important part in developing character. Whilst there is no definitive set of character traits, consider for instance perseverance, commitment, and self-discipline. That learning a musical instrument contributes to developing these is threaded throughout my book Learning Strategies for Musical Success. Learning music is a long-term project requiring years of disciplined practice. Incorporating some of the most complex physical skills human beings are capable of executing, perseverance and stick-at-it-ive-ness are a must. To master difficult musical passages, musicians learn to overcome setbacks and self-doubt. Successful musicians do not give up. Learning music is a long-term commitment requiring self-discipline, self-sacrifice, and an ability to resist distraction. Clearly, music makes a unique contribution in the education of character. Many people desire to learn music but give up too early without ever fully exploring their potential. Often, the reason given is ‘lack of talent’. A more likely explanation is the lack of character traits required for the musical journey. Being a musician is in itself a testament to character.

Almost 2500 years ago Plato believed that “music training is a more potent instrument than any other”. Hopefully the world will again give music the place it deserves in education. There are positive signs.  In April, 2015 it was announced that for the first time in USA education history, music will be a core subject in draft federal education policy (Every Child Achieves Act of 2015).

Listening to music has long been argued as a method for developing children’s listening skills. Listening to classical music boosts concentration, self-discipline, listening power, social intelligence, and aspiration. (Hallam, 2014) Equally, another study found that listening to music with lyrics about alcohol makes people more likely to drink. (Primack, 2014). Yet another study found a link between music embodying aggression, sex and violence, with antisocial behaviour. (Coyne and Padilla-Walker, 2014). Listening to particular types of content in music has an effect on behaviour. These studies might serve to argue against the popular contention that there is no such thing as good or bad music.

Michael Griffin will be speaking in schools and at music-service conferences in the UK Sept -Nov, 2015.

Contact mdgriffin63@gmail.com for more information.

‘Learning Strategies for Musical Success’ by Michael Griffin.

American Music Teacher

“Super book. I am so impressed!” – Donna Michaels, USA

“Fantastic book, simply brilliant! – Ian Cooper, Norfolk, UK

“Rarely do I come away feeling so inspired. Incredibly beneficial.” – Music Matters Blog

“A must buy for every music teacher and music student” – William Bruce, Teacher of Strings, UK.

“Deeply impressive, the breadth of research is fascinating!” – Robert Chamberlain, Team of Pianists and Monash University Piano Staff, Victoria Australia.

front cover final

Amazon
Amazon UK
Kindle US
Kindle UK
Australia: Contact mdgriffin63@gmail.com for direct mail.

Also by Michael Griffin

BookCoverPreview

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Fundamentals of Notation is a unit of work for general music middle school classes. Designed around the mastering of practical skills, it integrates theory, aural and history, and allows students to progress at their own rate. View Table of Contents.  “This has been a great buy; the books are just superb! Interesting topics with a wide range of pieces. Great content with clear progression of learning. Fascinating teaching philosophy! BRAVO!” -The Grieg Academy, London. Available at Amazon.com

BookCoverPreview Bk 2

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Let’s Get Creative! is the fun and creative extension to ‘Fundamentals of Notation’.

View Table of Contents. “We have been using your keyboard course and the results have been amazing!”  – St George College, Australia

Available at Amazon.com

BookCover VR

‘Bumblebee: Rounds & Warm-ups for Choirs’

Second edition. Bumblebee! is more than just a wonderful collection of 130 choir exercises and rounds. The author shares timeless wisdom to help you get your choir – primary or secondary – into shape.
View Table of Contents.

“Will prove useful for almost everyone”- Rhinegold Music Teacher Magazine.

“This is a great resource to add to one’s library of rehearsal tricks.”- Anacrusis, ACCC, Canada

harmony bk cover

Modern Harmony Method: Fundamentals of Jazz and Popular Harmony (Third Edition, 2013) is a clear and well organised text suitable for students of arranging and composition, and for classically trained musicians wishing to grasp the beautiful logic of jazz harmony. Essential understandings include chord selection, voicing, symbols, circle of 4th progressions, extensions, suspensions and alterations. Included in the 107 pages are explanations, examples, exercises and solutions. The course can be started with students in year 9 and worked through to year 12 musicianship, composing and arranging.  Available at Amazon.com

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in ancient greece education, character, China, classical greece, Confucius, Emotional intelligence, Multiple Intelligence, Music Education, Music psychology

Collaborative Learning in Music – Get With The Team

I’ve worked with Phil Rooke a couple of years ago when he invited me to address his music staff in Sydney. Phil is doing a fabulous job inspiring numerous primary schools in Western Sydney to take up string immersion programs. The results and outcomes are exciting. I love hearing his ‘good news’ stories about student engagement

Captivate Your Music Students🙂

CapStrings1Welcome to the first post for 2015.  In this post, I would like to examine and explore the reasons that we play music in ensembles. This has in fact been a learning journey for me in my career as a music educator. I think that sometimes we lose sight of the untapped teaching and learning potential of ensemble playing and we forget the reason that we do all the work of establishing ensembles if it is only to have ‘representative’ ensembles to promote the music department or school.

Many years ago, (1987) my first position as a classroom music teacher was at a High School in the Central West of New South Wales. The only equipment was an ancient piano, a drum-kit, a small powered mixing desk and PA speakers, an early model Roland Juno synth, an electric guitar and amplifier and electric bass and amplifier.

BUT……in the storeroom was…

View original post 2,287 more words

Posted in Uncategorized

How to Become an Expert – A Musical Perspective

Earlier this year I had the pleasure of being a guest on Eugene Loh’s 938Live radio show  ‘A Slice of Life’ in Singapore.

We talked about the nature and pursuit of expertise, mostly -but not exclusively – from a musical perspective. The show goes for about 30 minutes and is easy to listen to.

It’s on YouTube at this link if you’d like to listen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nczZ4lngQHE

Topics discussed include genetic giftedness, 10 000 hours, repetition, chunking and slow learning, myelin, persistence and self restraint, Dweck’s concept of ‘mindset’, Csiksentmihalyi’s ‘Flow’, Einstein, choir singing and oxytocin, and music’s effect on the brain. These topics are further explored in ‘Learning Strategies for Musical Success’ by Michael Griffin. Reviews below.

The Music Trust 

VMTA

American Music Teacher

Ritmico NZ

“Super book. I am so impressed!” – Donna Michaels, USA

“Fantastic book, simply brilliant! – Ian Cooper, Norfolk, UK

“Don’t miss this opportunity!” – Mary George, USA

“Rarely do I come away feeling so inspired. Incredibly beneficial.” – Music Matters Blog

“A must buy for every music teacher and music student” – William Bruce, Teacher of Strings, UK.

“Deeply impressive, the breadth of research is fascinating!” – Robert Chamberlain, Team of Pianists and Monash University Piano Staff, Victoria Australia.

front cover final

“I have read your book and it has made an amazing difference in my teaching and in my studio.” Beth Cruickshank, Past President – Ontario Registered Music Teachers Association.

Amazon
Amazon UK
Kindle US
Kindle UK
Australia: Contact mdgriffin63@gmail.com for direct mail.

Also by Michael Griffin

BookCoverPreview

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Fundamentals of Notation is a unit of work for general music middle school classes. Designed around the mastering of practical skills, it integrates theory, aural and history, and allows students to progress at their own rate. View Table of Contents.  “This has been a great buy; the books are just superb! Interesting topics with a wide range of pieces. Great content with clear progression of learning. Fascinating teaching philosophy! BRAVO!” -The Grieg Academy, London. Available at Amazon.com

BookCoverPreview Bk 2

Music and Keyboard in the Classroom: Let’s Get Creative! is the fun and creative extension to ‘Fundamentals of Notation’.

View Table of Contents. “We have been using your keyboard course and the results have been amazing!”  – St George College, Australia

Available at Amazon.com

BookCover VR

‘Bumblebee: Rounds & Warm-ups for Choirs’

Second edition. Bumblebee! is more than just a wonderful collection of 130 choir exercises and rounds. The author shares timeless wisdom to help you get your choir – primary or secondary – into shape.
View Table of Contents.

“Will prove useful for almost everyone”- Rhinegold Music Teacher Magazine.

“This is a great resource to add to one’s library of rehearsal tricks.”- Anacrusis, ACCC, Canada

harmony bk cover

Modern Harmony Method: Fundamentals of Jazz and Popular Harmony (Third Edition, 2013) is a clear and well organised text suitable for students of arranging and composition, and for classically trained musicians wishing to grasp the beautiful logic of jazz harmony. Essential understandings include chord selection, voicing, symbols, circle of 4th progressions, extensions, suspensions and alterations. Included in the 107 pages are explanations, examples, exercises and solutions. The course can be started with students in year 9 and worked through to year 12 musicianship, composing and arranging.  Available at Amazon.com

Tagged with: , , , , , ,
Posted in Emotional intelligence, Multiple Intelligence, Music Education, Music psychology